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20121230
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as a powerful intelligence tool. then with washington mired in political gridlock we take a closer look at the last great senate. but first, the nonpartisan stimson center recently released a report, a new u.s. defense strategy for a new era that outlines four approaches for cutting defense spending but maintaining capability. stimson's co-founder barry blechman spearheaded the study. the report has become a must- read for anyone involved in the coming defense review or budget planning team. barry, welcome to the team. >> thank you, vag go. >> congratulations for your slot on the defense news top 100 most influential people. >> that was the biggest thrill of the year. >> so let's start off with the report. each report begins with assumptions about threats to the united states to be facing and what's going to be needed to meet them what. are those threats and what's the right strategy to address those threats as cost efficiently as possible? >> the group was more optimistic than many people in looking at the world. they see russia as a country that doesn't pose any threats now and really
the can down the road doesn't make anybody younger or wiser in washington, but often keeps them elected. thanks for watching "state of the union" i'm candy crowley in washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." stay with cnn for continuing coverage of the fiscal cliff negotiations. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> the great french writer albert camel said life is a sum of all your choices. we're all defined by the choices we make every day, we make hundreds of them. paper or plastic, chicken or fish, most are mundane and require little thought, but others are agonizing, often life altering and then there are the decisions made by leaders. some of which have changed the course of history for better and some for worse. july 1776, the founding fathers decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine t
here in the washington, d.c. and works in treasury can attend one of his father's talks. and i didn't even make him buy the book, which -- [laughter] is the key. i'm particularly proud of scott, and just want to say that. and i look around the room, there are some other good friends including my oldest friend and college roommate, it's just really great just to see so many people here. so i've got 30 minutes, 30, 35 minutes. because what i've learned is, and this is difficult to only speak for 35 minutes on a book because, first of all, professors are programmed to talk at 45-minute intervals. i'm not sure i can do anything in 30 minutes, but i really do try because often times the questions are really the best part. and your questions will allow me to either follow up on areas that i maybe didn't cover, or if i don't like the question, i'll just talk about whatever i want. which, you know, the presidential candidates can do it, i am entitled to do that as well. [laughter] so i want to talk to you about what this book is and what this book is not. i want to introduce you, particular
to the relationships here in washington, it's a good thing that it's these two men that are working together and you're right, it does rest on their shoulders right now. >> dana bash, covering the stories for us on capitol hill. i have with me michael crowley, and a.b. stoddard and jessica yellen. >> it's great if the two can come to an agreement and the white house loves it, but it's always been the house that's been the sticking point. what do you think the scenario is there, a.b.? >> that's going to be tough for the house speaker. he said on friday in meeting with all the leaders and the president that he wanted to bring something up. might be amended and sent back to the senate. he doesn't know what's in there. how much money the democrats are going to push for to cover the medicare doc fix. the uninsurance -- excuse me, unemployment insurance that is going to lapse at the end of the year and put 2 million people out of reach of a check. and there's other issues. the alternative minimum tax. a lot of money that they're scrambling to find as they also deal with the tax issues. so it's really goin
powell of the supreme court. was a lawyer and was planning to do that for my career in washington. was plucked to be general counsel of the parent company of abc back in 81. i did that for a few years. through a roundabout way i ended up becoming president of abc news. it's not something i ever saw to do. even when what to do it i did it because we need secession plant because we needed secession plan and his i thought i would do it for a couple of years. the biggest surprise was that came to absolutely love it. i've met some wonderful jobs. i've been very blessed, but been any news organization like abc news, much less running it is a rare privilege. that's part of the reason i wrote the book is, people have not had that experience, some sense what it is like. >> how do you get to go to the supreme court? what was that process? what did you learn at the supreme court that helped you run abc? >> as i said it went to michigan undergraduate, and sort of wandered into the law. i was fortunate because is a great law school. like the one you have here at university of texas, austin. i
. maybe sequestration is going to happen so for that let's go to washington. >> juliet: all right. tick-tock, tick-tock, time is almost up for lawmakers as we say to avert the fiscal cliff. they worked throughout the weekend in hopes of hammering out some sort of deal. >> dave: peter doocy is live in washington and we hustle you over to the capitol. and what is the latest, do you think we'll get something done? >> reporter: dave, we were told late in the evening that legislative staff was going to work through the night, but the only principal we heard from was mitch mcconnell who said he and his democratic counterparts have been trading paper all day saturday, but the only big news, mcconnell cared to share with us, in the state he represents, kentucky, louisville beat the university of kentucky by three and meanwhile, the officially republican weekly address features another republican senator explaining once again why a deal before monday night's deadline is so important. >> at a time when our federal debt's topped 16 trillion dollars, it's been more than three years since the senate
a script. it didn't work for me, but 10 years later it haunted me that story in washington and he is still teaching a class when i came back. we decided to go ahead and do it.mandari about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned into ultimately -- our eyes are bigger than our stomachs and we tried a 12 hour national security state story from the 1940s to now and it actually started in 1900 with the philippine american war but the spanish-american war and then in 2012, we started 1940 in the series. the book two years after our series we decided hey this is getting very serious and we know i'm going to be called on this because of my back round in making movies. people will say this is part fiction and part fantasy that we decided to go ahead and go with this book. peter took over the book. i was running the series, the film and we were cross fading all the time and checking each other constantly but it took about four and a half or five years now and that is where we are today. >> host: go ahead. >> guest: we have been friends for that whole period since 1996 and then we decided we were
to stand and say the pledge allegiance at a romney political rally and "washington
and why we did it was not based on the speech from washington because it was love of the man next to you. it is a cliche will men jumping out of the trench but that does not keep it from being true. questions like that i focus on the small part that i could do something about. >> the war is as small as it is for you. a general expressing opinion is something we could use more of. but the overall worry is if someone is hiding something, what else are they hiding? how much of anything is ever true? it is on a level of such high discussion that you have to diffuse the bomb and i have to keep 150 marines from being dead. does anyone notice? becomes over detachments of how much of the war is real to those not actively in engaged on the ground. >> i am not a veteran but i see myself as an advocate just because he sits right here. i wanted to read the passage if you keep said general betray as high jinks in mind this is what the first attendant was going through a 1.2 thousand seven. >> up the mountain the first platoon regaining used to a lifestyle even more spartan than the one down the hill.
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9